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Monitoring Progress of Students Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing

Federal and state legislation has placed a renewed emphasis on accountability and academic outcomes among students who are deaf or hard of hearing. While much attention is given to norm-referenced standardized testing accommodations, there is a need for functional formative assessments for the purpose of monitoring students' academic progress. This paper addresses some of the evaluative perspective of students' academic performance within the field of deaf education and the critical need for progress monitoring. A brief review is included of studies conducted using Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM) with students who are deaf and hard of hearing.

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Research Matters / How Student Progress Monitoring Improves Instruction

This is a brief article that describes the role of student progress monitoring in ensuring that all students meet academic standards. The SPM procedure is described from both technical and practical perspectives. Additionally, research on SPM’s effectiveness for students and teachers is discussed. Finally, the authors conclude by informing educators that SPM may have begun as a special education practice, but there is ample evidence that SPM is beneficial for all students.

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Annotated Bibliography of Selected Curriculum-Based Measurement Articles: 2006 Update

This annotated bibliography provides you with sources to find research that supports the use of Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM). Among other things, the research cited here supports the use of CBM to enhance instructional decision making, to identify students who are at risk of not meeting end of year goals, and to help students become more aware of their own academic performance.

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Annotated Bibliography of Selected Curriculum-Based Measurement Articles

This annotated bibliography provides you with sources to find research that supports the use of Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM). Among other things, the research cited here supports the use of CBM to enhance instructional decision making, to identify students who are at risk of not meeting end of year goals, and to help students become more aware of their own academic performance.

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Formative Evaluation of Academic Progress

Lynn S. Fuchs and Douglas Fuchs
Vanderbilt University

This study examined students' weekly rates of academic growth when Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM) was conducted repeatedly for 1 year. Findings are discussed in terms of how to use normative slope data to establish appropriate goals for student outcomes. Implications that are also discussed include: (a) how such norms can be developed for other ongoing assessment systems, (b) developing a technology for the measurement of student change, and (c) developmental theories of academic growth.

Fuchs, Lynn S., Fuchs, Douglas, School Psychology Review, 02796015, 1993, Vol. 22, Issue 1. Copyright 1993 by the National Association of School Psychologists. Reproduced with permission of the publisher.

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Determining Adequate Yearly Progress from Kindergarten through Grade 6 with Curriculum-Based Measurement

Adapted by Kellie Kim-Sung
National Center on Student Progress Monitoring

Progress monitoring is a scientifically based practice that teachers can use to evaluate the effectiveness of their instruction for individual students or their entire class. Teachers identify goals for what their students will learn over time, measure their students' progress toward meeting these goals by comparing expected and actual rates of learning, and adjust their teaching as needed. The benefits of progress monitoring include accelerated learning for students who receive more appropriate instruction and more informed instructional decisions and higher expectations for students by teachers. Overall, the use of progress monitoring results in more efficient and appropriately targeted instructional techniques and goals, which, together, move all students to faster attainment of important state standards for their achievement.

Adapted by Kellie Kim-Sung from Fuchs, L.S., Fuchs, D.. Determining Annual Yearly Progress from Kindergarten through Grade 6 with Curriculum-Based Measurement. In press. Assessment for Effective Intervention.

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Developments in Curriculum-Based Measurement

Stan Deno
University of Minnesota

Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM) is an approach for assessing the growth of students in basic skills that originated uniquely in special education. A substantial research literature has developed to demonstrate that CBM can be used effectively to gather student performance data to support a wide range of educational decisions. Those decisions include screening to identify, evaluating prereferral interventions, determining eligibility for and placement in remedial and special education programs, formatively evaluating instruction, and evaluation reintegration and inclusion of students in mainstream programs. Beyond those fundamental uses of CBM, recent research has been conducted on using CBM to predict success in high-stakes assessment, to measure growth in content areas in secondary school programs, and to assess growth in early childhood programs. In this article, best practices in CBM are described and empirical support for those practices is identified. Illustrations of the successful uses of CBM to improve educational decision making are provided.

From "Developments in Curriculum-Based Measurement" by S.L. Deno, 2003, The Journal of Special Education, 37. 3., 184-192. Copyright (2003) by PRO-ED, Inc. Reprinted with permission.

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How Progress Monitoring Assists Decision Making in a Response to Instruction Framework

Deborah Speece
University of Maryland

My colleagues and I studied a Response to Instruction model as a method of identifying children for special education services. To judge responsiveness, we used curriculum-based measures of oral reading fluency to monitor progress. In one of the schools we worked in, children were administered these one-minute measures every week. About every 8 weeks we met with the children's teachers to share graphs of children's progress, identify children who were falling behind their peers, and design reading interventions that the general educator thought were feasible to implement in the classroom. Children who caught up with their peers were considered responsive and continued with weekly measurement; those who did not make adequate progress continued to receive specially-designed intervention from the general education teacher as well as weekly measurement. This process generated a number of examples of how weekly progress monitoring, which includes systematic data interpretation and teacher action, is central to good decision making in an RTI framework. Two children are discussed whose profiles illustrate different aspects of the progress monitoring-RTI interface.

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Monitoring Student Progress in Individualized Educational Programs Using Curriculum-Based Measurement

Pamela M. Stecker
Clemson University

Curriculum-Based Measurement (CBM) encompasses an assessment methodology that can be used to develop goals, benchmarks, or short-term objectives for individualized educational programs for students with disabilities. Teachers also use curriculum-based measurement as a means for monitoring student progress across the year. This paper describes CBM in reading and mathematics and provides sample goal statements for each area. In addition, the process by which teachers can examine data and make meaningful decisions about the overall effectiveness of their instruction is described.

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Progress Monitoring in an Inclusive Standards-Based Assessment and Accountability System

National Center on Educational Outcomes

This report describes how progress monitoring-a set of techniques for assessing student performance on a regular and frequent basis-can be an essential and integral part of an inclusive standards-based assessment and accountability system. In order to meet the higher expectations of current standards-based systems, educators need information that can be used to project how students are doing against the grade-level standards throughout the course of the year so they can determine what needs to be done to accelerate student progress toward the proficiency standards. Progress monitoring techniques can provide that information.

We discuss the benefits and uses of progress monitoring methods and formative data sources in four general categories: (1) Curriculum-Based Measurement; (2) Classroom assessments (system or teacher-developed); (3) Adaptive assessments; and (4) Large-scale assessments used during the year to monitor growth of individual students and groups of students.

From Quenemoen, R., Thurlow, M., Moen, R., Thompson, S., & Morse, A. B. (2004). Progress monitoring in an inclusive standards-based assessment and accountability system (Synthesis Report 53). Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota, National Center on Educational Outcomes.

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What Is Scientifically Based Research on Progress Monitoring?

Lynn S. Fuchs and Douglas Fuchs
Vanderbilt University

When teachers use systematic progress monitoring to track their students progress in reading, mathematics, or spelling, they are better able to identify students in need of additional or different forms of instruction, they design stronger instructional programs, and their students achieve better. This document first describes progress monitoring procedures for which experimental evidence demonstrates these effects. Then, an overview of the research is presented.

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Curriculum-Based Measurement Resources for Secondary-School Level

Research Institute on Progress Monitoring

This paper contains a reference list of articles and book chapters on the development of progress monitoring procedures for secondary-school students in reading, content-area learning, and writing. It also includes a brief section on what student progress monitoring practices have been proven to work at the secondary level.

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